We recently came across aerial photos of our neighborhood from 1936. We've had a blast pouring over them, seeing how the fields and even the roads have changed over time. Of special interest to us, of course, are the trees. We love seeing the empty patches in 1936 filling in with leafy green oaks, maples and firs.

See for yourself - use the slider to switch back and forth between then and now. (It may take a minute or two to load.)

Posted
AuthorPaul Boers

Last week, Bill Wessinger of Wessinger Woodworks stopped by the mill to pick up some green Oregon White Oak bending lumber.  Bill has been buying wood from us since 2011, and he makes furniture and also dabbles in boat building.  Combining these two passions of his, he has also been making some amazing wood sculptures.  The pictures speak for themselves.  You can check out Bill's instagram page for lots more amazing pictures of his work.

Posted
AuthorBen Deumling

   One of the rewards of the work that we do here is collaborating with phenomenal craftsmen and women.  We spend our time in the forest working with logs and big machines, in the mud or the dust.  We turn trees into lumber for someone else to work with.  When lumber leaves our hands, it is still in a semi-unfinished state.

   The very talented crew at the Joinery has been building furniture with Oregon White Oak from Zena Forest Products for a couple years now.  They recently produced this video about what they do.  Seeing our trees turned into these works of art is a wonderful reward for us.

Posted
AuthorBen Deumling

   As a young man trying to learn how to run a sawmill, I had the good fortune of having a number of experienced sawyers offer to show me what they knew.  A couple years before I started Zena Forest products, I was 23 years old, and I went to work for a man named Rod Jacobs, sawing highly figured Maple.  The end users of the wood we were sawing were primarily guitar makers.  This was a wonderful crash course in the art of sawing, and there was little room for error.  I learned a ton in that first year, and I was fortunate that Rod was willing to continue to work closely with me for many years once I started my own sawmill.

   I recently caught up with Rod, who is still sawing for guitar makers.  He sent me these pictures from the NAMM show in Anaheim of some Martin guitars featuring Oregon Maple that he had recently sawn.  

   I will let the pictures speak for themselves.

Posted
AuthorBen Deumling